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2017 Associate Sponsors

Insulet Corporation
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2017 Technology Sponsors

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Enable Injections
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Halozyme
InnoCore Pharmaceuticals
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Oakwood Labs
Phion Therapeutics Limited
Portal Instruments
Quantex Vernay
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Baumann Group
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Maxon Motor
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Event Blog

Keynoted by Dr Robert Langer of MIT, this is a strategic level event designed with two purposes:

1. To present a strategic level event for pharma and biotech business development and external licensing professionals with a thorough overview of the latest drug delivery technologies available along with an update on deals and opportunities to enhance patients, therapies and the life cycle of a drug.

2. To provide drug delivery and specialty pharmas with a platform to present their technologies and get the latest insights from both established pharma and biotechs as well as start up companies on what the delivery and formulation needs are.

For More information click here.


  • December 12, 2016

  • Prof George Church on Genetic Advances, New Promises and of Course, the Woolly Mammoth in 10 Questions with PODD Director, Valerie Bowling

    George Church, Professor of Genetics at Harvard Medical School, keynoted at the 2016 PODD Boston conference and sat with Director, Valerie Bowling for 10 Questions that were contributed directly from the PODD audience. Professor Church is also the Director of PersonalGenomes.org, which provides the only open-access information on human genomic, environmental and trait data (GET). […]

    George Church, Professor of Genetics at Harvard Medical School, keynoted at the 2016 PODD Boston conference and sat with Director, Valerie Bowling for 10 Questions that were contributed directly from the PODD audience. Professor Church is also the Director of PersonalGenomes.org, which provides the only open-access information on human genomic, environmental and trait data (GET).

    PODD is the Partnership Opportunities in Drug Delivery conference that takes place annually each October in Boston. It is designed with the following three purposes:

    1. To present a strategic level program for pharma and biotech business development professionals with a thorough overview of the latest drug delivery technologies available along with an update on deals and opportunities to improve therapies and extend the life cycle of a drug.
    2. To provide drug delivery and specialty pharmas with a platform to present their technologies and get the latest insights on what the delivery and formulation needs are.
    3. To offer ample networking time, facilities and services for one-on-one meetings to establish new business contacts and enhance existing ones.

    For more information, please click here.

    georgechurchinterview-blog

    Prof George Church Speaking with PODD Director, Valerie Bowling

    georgechurchkeynotingatpodd-blog

    Prof George Church Keynoting at PODD

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  • October 28, 2016

  • Recap of PODD 2016

    PODD 2016 Day One: October 27 Recap The sixth annual Partnership Opportunities in Drug Delivery (PODD) conference is officially underway at Boston’s Fairmont Copley Plaza. If you missed Day One of the conference, we can’t replicate the partnering and networking, but we can provide you with a closer look at five key topics that were […]

    PODD 2016 Day One: October 27 Recap

    The sixth annual Partnership Opportunities in Drug Delivery (PODD) conference is officially underway at Boston’s Fairmont Copley Plaza.

    If you missed Day One of the conference, we can’t replicate the partnering and networking, but we can provide you with a closer look at five key topics that were discussed on Day One at PODD 2016.

    1. Innovation in Medicine

    A new class of medical devices may transform the biomedical space – miniature implantable devices.

    PODD Chair Barbara Lueckel pointed out these devices could change the way biomedical companies treat many diseases.

    “The idea is to think very differently about how to treat diseases like diabetes and asthma,” she stated.

    Lueckel also noted the development of a one-touch insulin patch pump and other state-of-the-art drug delivery devices could create many opportunities for biomedical companies worldwide.

    “There is a huge growth opportunity for the companies in this field … and the patients,” she said.

    2. Extended-Release Drug Delivery Systems

    Imagine what it would be like if an individual could ingest a single capsule to treat a chronic disease over the course of a week, month or year. Now, gastrointestinal drug delivery devices for extended release are being developed to transform this idea into a reality.

    Robert Langer, David H. Koch Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), examined the concept of “super-long” active drug delivery systems and their potential impact on adherence to treatment of chronic diseases in his keynote address to PODD 2016 attendees.

    Langer stated the impact of poor adherence grows as the burden of chronic disease increases globally.

    Conversely, technology could redefine what long-acting oral formulation means for both biomedical companies and patients, leading to advanced drug delivery systems to improve treatment adherence.

    “If you could make a drug last longer and longer, you’d probably have less of a chance of forgetting to take it, and adherence will go up,” Langer said.

    3. Creative Partnerships in Healthcare

    What differentiates a traditional partnership from a creative one in the healthcare space? Richard Korsmeyer, PhD, Executive Director of Advanced External Projects and the Technology & Innovation Group at Pfizer, outlined the key differences between these partnerships during a PODD 2016 panel discussion.

    “In a traditional model, one party has an asset that it thinks is worth something, and the other party has money,” he said. “But there are healthcare needs that are not met by that model, and we need to find more creative ways to partner to create opportunities.”

    Ultimately, creative partnerships may deliver many benefits for biomedical companies and patients.

    These partnerships enable biomedical companies to identify and address opportunities in the healthcare market, which may lead to improved patient outcomes.

    “Creative partnering is not just nice to have, it’s a must-have these days,” said PJ Anand, CEO of biotechnology company Alcoyne Lifesciences. “The key here is not just to innovate on the technologies but to innovate on the business model.”

    4. Lessons Learned from Successful Drug Delivery Partnerships

    Several AstraZeneca, Pfizer and Starpharma representatives discussed what it takes to foster mutually beneficial drug delivery partnerships as they examined a partnering case study at PODD 2016.

    Adam McNulty, Business Development Manager of Scientific Partnering & Alliances at AstraZeneca, noted his company wants to work with “the best and the brightest.” As such, to develop a successful drug delivery partnership, AstraZeneca searches for partners who drive innovation.

    “If you founded the technology and developed it, we want to work with you,” McNulty noted.

    Of course, maintaining consistent communication can make a world of difference for biomedical companies that want to reap the benefits of long-lasting drug delivery partnerships.

    “There is nothing like having that face-to-face interaction,” said Tony Eglezos, Vice President of Business Development at Starpharma. “An important thing through any collaboration is there is a constant dialogue, and if issues do come up, you need to manage them quickly.”

    5. The Drug Delivery Landscape

    The drug delivery landscape is rapidly evolving. In fact, at least one biomedical market expert has compared the landscape to the Roman Empire – perhaps for good reason.

    “I think drug delivery is a little like the Roman Empire,” Josef Bossart, PhD, Executive Editor at PharmaCircle, told PODD 2016 attendees. “The Roman Empire never fell. … [And even though] drug delivery has changed, it’s still critically important.”

    Bossart pointed out the number of drug delivery-related transactions has been flat over the past decade, and technology deals in the drug delivery space have decreased as well.

    However, biomedical companies can learn from the past and use this information to better understand how the drug delivery landscape may continue to evolve.

    Day One of PODD 2016 has reached its conclusion, and Day Two is right around the corner.

    Check out our blog and follow the Twitter hashtag #PODD2016 for the latest PODD 2016 news and updates.


     

    PODD 2016 Day Two: October 28 Recap

    The sixth annual Partnership Opportunities in Drug Delivery (PODD) conference ended Friday after a series of keynote presentations, panel discussions and partnering meetings.

    Here are five highlights from Day Two of PODD 2016.

    1. InCube Labs CEO Discusses Innovations in Drug Delivery

    Mir Imran, CEO of clinical research firm InCube Labs, provided a glimpse into the future of transdermal, implantable and biological drug delivery in his keynote address to PODD attendees.

    Transdermal drug delivery has grown exponentially over the past few decades and generates roughly $7 billion annually, Imran said. Furthermore, Imran stated the transdermal drug delivery market may continue to grow based on the rising demand for estrogen, fentanyl and nicotine patches.

    Implantable drug delivery is becoming increasingly popular as well. It offers a reliable drug delivery option for treatment of chronic diseases, Imran said, and boasts limited side effects and better efficacy compared to other treatment options.

    Lastly, Imran said biological drug delivery has been called the “holy grail” of drug delivery options, and the Rani Therapeutics robotic pill and other biological products eventually could replace numerous injectable drugs for chronic diseases.

    2. Biogen’s SVP of Technical Development Explores the Future of Biomanufacturing

    Jorg Thommes, Senior Vice President of Technical Development at Biogen, discussed the next generation of manufacturing proteins, small molecules, oligonucleotides and gene therapy products in his keynote presentation to PODD attendees.

    Biomanufacturing has evolved from an art into a science over the past few years, according to Thommes, and having the right biomanufacturing processes in place could deliver many benefits for biomedical companies.

    “Operations is a competitive advantage,” he said. “We have to think about how we’ll make a lot of antibodies with very little money.”

    Thommes emphasized the importance of process technologies, process controls and facility design in biomanufacturing.

    He noted biomedical companies that focus on these areas will be equipped to handle myriad biomanufacturing challenges and can scale their operations effectively.

    3. Biomedical Professionals Share Their Thoughts on High Viscosity Drug Device Strategies and Solutions

    Several biomedical professionals offered insights into their high viscosity drug device strategies and solutions at PODD 2016.

    Bill Welch, Chief Technology Officer at Phillips-Medisize, stated high viscosity drug devices can drive improved patient outcomes. As a result, the demand for these devices may increase over the next few years.

    “The creativity of our industry is really being tapped to create these devices,” Welch told PODD attendees.

    Ultimately, biomedical companies must be able to identify the challenges associated with high viscosity drugs.

    “We are trying to assist either the patient or the supplier by introducing [new devices]. The longer the device sits on a patient’s body, new problems may come into the picture,” said Atul Patel, Biogen’s Director of Device Development.

    Chris McKenzie, Business Development Specialist at Battelle, added that he believes biomedical companies need to understand the true value of high viscosity drug devices to devise effective strategies and solutions.

    “Make sure you have the fundamental understanding of your technology and be able to articulate it,” he stated.

    4. Pharmaceutical Companies Highlight Their Partnering Strategies

    Finding the right partner in the drug delivery market may seem impossible at times, and several pharmaceutical company representatives discussed their partnering strategies.

    What defines a great partner? Anthony Trupiano, Head of Combination Product Device Development for Research and Development at biopharmaceutical company Shire, said expertise remains paramount.

    “There are some great companies out there with some great expertise, and we need to leverage that expertise that is out there,” he said.

    For Allergan, the company utilizes an “Open Science” research and development model to drive healthcare innovation.

    James Cunningham, Allergan’s Director of Ocular Drug Delivery, stated Open Science empowers his company to embrace new ideas and innovations. Thus, Allergan is ready to drive partnerships that may deliver long-lasting results.

    Meanwhile, Marta Corcoran, Senior Scientist for Drug Delivery and Development at MedImmune, pointed out her company prioritizes patient centricity. As such, MedImmune leverages alliances, licensing arrangements and other partnerships to foster innovation, Corcoran said.

    5. Digital Therapeutics Experts Discuss the Opportunities and Challenges of Digital Drug Delivery

    Technology has transformed the medical landscape, and this trend appears likely to continue into the foreseeable future. However, biomedical companies that address the opportunities and challenges of digital drug delivery today may be better equipped to manage new digital drug technologies as soon as they become available.

    “I think of digital drug delivery as digital drug therapy,” said Christopher Coletta, former Director of Drug Delivery Innovation at Amgen. “Connectivity is starting to be incorporated into drug delivery devices, and we need to consider how that is going to drive value (for stakeholders).”

    In addition, data analytics are becoming increasingly common among businesses and consumers and may reshape the drug delivery landscape.

    Data analytics empower biomedical companies to learn about chronic diseases and tailor patient treatments based on a wealth of patient data. At the same time, data analytics raise regulatory and privacy concerns.

    Eric Elenko, Executive Vice President of Science and Technology at PureTech, stated data analytics can drive biomedical enhancements if they preserve patient privacy and correspond to the workflow of the current healthcare system.

    “Data analytics need to be done in a way that is beneficial to the physician and the patient,” he said.

    PODD 2016 is over, but planning for next year’s conference is already underway.

    Be sure to check back for updates about PODD 2017, which will take place Oct. 19 and 20, 2017 at Boston’s Marriott Copley Plaza.

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  • October 27, 2016

  • MIT’s Robert Langer Receives Award at PODD 2016

    Partnership Opportunities in Drug Delivery (PODD) Chair Dr Barbara Lueckel kicked off this year’s PODD conference by recognizing one of the event’s long-time contributors – Robert Langer. Langer, David H. Koch Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), received an award prior to his PODD 2016 keynote address in recognition of his contributions […]

    Partnership Opportunities in Drug Delivery (PODD) Chair Dr Barbara Lueckel kicked off this year’s PODD conference by recognizing one of the event’s long-time contributors – Robert Langer.

    Langer, David H. Koch Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), received an award prior to his PODD 2016 keynote address in recognition of his contributions to the PODD community.

    robert_langer_podd2016

    Dr Robert Langer kicks off his annual keynote and begins with the challenge of adherence. If we took drugs fewer times, would we improve patient adherence?

    “This is for all of the inspiring lectures you give to us and the inspiration you give to patients,” Lueckel said.

    Langer remains one of the world’s leading biomedical experts, and some of his career accomplishments include:

    • Over 220 awards, including the 2002 Charles Stark Draper Prize (sometimes referred to as the engineering Nobel Prize), 2012 Priestley Medal (the highest award provided by the American Chemical Society) and 2015 Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering (the world’s largest engineering prize).
    • More than 1,100 issued and pending patents that have been licensed or sublicensed to over 300 biotechnology, chemical, pharmaceutical and medical device companies worldwide.
    • 27 honorary doctorates, including honorary degrees from Harvard University and Yale University.
      In addition, Langer has delivered many notable keynote presentations at PODD events, educating the PODD community about a wide range of biomedical advancements.

    Langer addressed the PODD community at this year’s PODD conference as well.

    In his keynote, Langer discussed the importance of gastrointestinal drug delivery devices for extended drug release and how these devices may help individuals adhere to chronic disease treatments.

    “Poor adherence to treatment to chronic diseases is a worldwide problem of striking magnitude,” he noted. “The impact of poor adherence grows as the burden of chronic disease grows worldwide.”

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  • September 28, 2016

  • PODD Speaker, Insitu Biologics Publishes White Paper on AnestaGel

    Authors: William Taylor, Daniel P. Sipple, D.O., F.A.B.P.M.R., D.A.B.P.M., Stefano M. Sinicropi, M.D., F.A.A.O.S. author white paper on the feasibility and duration of AnestaGel-P, a novel hydrogel-based drug delivery system to provide sustained analgesia was evaluated in a post-operative incisional pain rat model when compared to a positive control, Exparel®. Click here for the entire white […]

    Authors: William Taylor, Daniel P. Sipple, D.O., F.A.B.P.M.R., D.A.B.P.M., Stefano M. Sinicropi, M.D., F.A.A.O.S. author white paper on the feasibility and duration of AnestaGel-P, a novel hydrogel-based drug delivery system to provide sustained analgesia was evaluated in a post-operative incisional pain rat model when compared to a positive control, Exparel®. Click here for the entire white paper.

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  • August 1, 2016

  • “From Zero to Six Million: Using a Component Management Process to Scale Up Manufacturing of Drug Delivery Devices” White Paper from NN, Inc. Precision Engineered Products Group (PEP)

    Drug delivery devices constitute one of the most rapidly growing segments of the medical device manufacturing market. Makers focus substantial R&D efforts on designing delivery mechanisms for new and existing drug formulations. However, even good initial designs can’t guarantee that all the parts for these devices can be manufactured correctly and assembled consistently, with few […]

    Drug delivery devices constitute one of the most rapidly growing segments of the medical device manufacturing market. Makers focus substantial R&D efforts on designing delivery mechanisms for new and existing drug formulations. However, even good initial designs can’t guarantee that all the parts for these devices can be manufactured correctly and assembled consistently, with few rejects. Success demands that parts suppliers adopt a systematic component management process for delivery of interrelated components.

    When multiple parts must fit into a single assembly at tight tolerances, sourcing parts to multiple suppliers may lead to off-spec pieces or lot-to-lot misalignments. OEMs would be well advised to choose a single source with a sufficiently wide array of core competencies in the advanced manufacturing methodologies often required. And perhaps most important, the chosen supplier should approach a challenging multipart project by utilizing a well-designed component management process.

    Screen Shot 2016-08-09 at 9.43.57 AMThe right process ensures that all parts meet specifications and are inter-assembled efficiently. More than that, it helps furnish the following advantages:

    • Consolidated supply chain management
    • Automated lot-to-lot consistency
    • Efficient assembly process troubleshooting
    • Shorter time to market
    • Improved drug delivery device performance
    • Systematic component traceability
    • Ongoing manufacturing cost management
    • Efficient scalability for high-volume production

    Such a process should include close attention to elements such as initial design, process variables, scalability, tooling development, supply chain coordination, certification and traceability, and quality best practices to ensure on-spec, exact-tolerance results. With proper planning and performance, these can provide affordable, highly scalable drug delivery device production.

    The “From Zero to Six Million: Using a Component Management Process to Scale Up Manufacturing of Drug Delivery Devices” white paper from NN, Inc. Precision Engineered Products Group (PEP) presents a case history wherein a successful component management process helped provide consistent, cost-effective, extremely scalable, and high-yield drug delivery device production.

    Visit NN, Inc. Precision Engineered Products Group (PEP) at Partnerships in Drug Delivery October 26-28, 2016 at Fairmont Copley Plaza in Boston, MA.

    Read the white paper here.

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  • June 30, 2016

  • PODD: Partnership Opportunities in Drug Delivery 6th Annual Event Announced

    Tthe 6th Annual Partnership Opportunities in Drug Delivery (PODD) conference will take place on October 27-28, 2016 at the Fairmont Copley Plaza in Boston, MA. This strategic-level event covers the latest drug delivery technology developments and fosters a network of more than 300 key decision makers in the drug delivery, pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. PODD […]

    Tthe 6th Annual Partnership Opportunities in Drug Delivery (PODD) conference will take place on October 27-28, 2016 at the Fairmont Copley Plaza in Boston, MA. This strategic-level event covers the latest drug delivery technology developments and fosters a network of more than 300 key decision makers in the drug delivery, pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

    PODD is chaired by Dr. Barbara Lueckel, Global Business Development Director at Roche and the opening keynote address is given by the renowned biomedical engineer, Dr. Robert Langer, the David H. Koch Institute Professor at MIT. Three additional keynote speakers are scheduled for the event: Dr. George Church, a genetics pioneer and professor at Harvard University; Mir Imran, a leading medical device inventor and life sciences entrepreneur; and Dr. Jorg Thommes, Senior Vice President of Technical Development at Biogen.

     

    On Day One, PODD delegates will hear from a distinguished speaking faculty on such topics as novel methods for cell and drug delivery, creative partnering models to support the earliest drug delivery innovations and keys to developing and maintaining successful drug delivery collaborations. In addition, there will be a full afternoon of drug delivery technology presentations in three tracks: Non-Injectable Delivery Technologies chaired by Ann Daugherty, PhD, Senior Manager of Drug Delivery at Genentech; Injectable Delivery Technologies chaired by Mark Wilson, Director of Platform Technology & Science at GSK and Director at SR One; and Drug Delivery Devices chaired by Ullrich Bruggemann, Head of Academics & Innovation at Sanofi.

    On Day Two, the esteemed speakers will engage in discussions related to the delivery of high volume/high viscosity drugs, digital drug delivery, enabling technologies for small molecules and emerging diabetes therapies. Delegates will also hear the results of recent patient research studies and the importance of developing patient-centric products. Finally, there will be multiple technology presentations from emerging drug delivery start-ups, as well as business development presentations from leading pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies.

    The PODD event is proud to be sponsored by a host of companies, including 3M Drug Delivery Systems, iO Lifescience, Pfizer, Balda Healthcare, PharmaCircle, Battelle, Enable Injections, Phillips Medisize, Serina Therapeutics, Starpharma, Quotient Clinical, Nemera, Oakwood Laboratories, West, Sensile Medical, Renishaw, Lucideon and Portal Instruments.

    PODD provides extensive networking opportunities ranging from pre-set partnering meetings to an evening reception, informal networking breaks to an exhibit hall with approximately 50 tech companies.

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  • November 18, 2015

  • PODD Keynote Speaker Dr Robert Langer, MIT Awarded the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering

    Our adored PODD Keynote, Dr Robert Langer was recently presented with the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering. Dr Langer was awarded the QEPrize for his revolutionary advances and leadership in engineering at the interface with chemistry and medicine. Dr Langer was the first person to engineer polymers to control the delivery of large molecular weight […]

    HRHDrLanger Our adored PODD Keynote, Dr Robert Langer was recently presented with the Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering. Dr Langer was awarded the QEPrize for his revolutionary advances and leadership in engineering at the interface with chemistry and medicine. Dr Langer was the first person to engineer polymers to control the delivery of large molecular weight drugs for the treatment of diseases such as cancer and mental illness. Over 2 billion lives have been improved worldwide by the technologies that Dr Langer’s lab has created.

     Queen Elizabeth prize for Engineering TrophyThe Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering Foundation exists to celebrate and promote engineering and to demonstrate its important role in society. While doing so, the prize also celebrates engineering as a discipline and career choice, shining light on the excitement and importance of engineering and inspiring young people to get involved in the subject.

     

    Huge congratulations to Dr Langer!

    Dr Langer receiving the award from HRH Queen Elizabeth

    Dr Langer’s Post Award Speech

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  • October 7, 2015

  • Thank You to the Entire PODD Community!

    As the 5th annual PODD event comes to a close, we look forward to start the planning for the 6th annual conference. This year’s event scaled new heights in attracting more than 300 executives and featuring the widest range of drug delivery technologies from start up to established. The event also had a record number […]

    PODDpic2015As the 5th annual PODD event comes to a close, we look forward to start the planning for the 6th annual conference. This year’s event scaled new heights in attracting more than 300 executives and featuring the widest range of drug delivery technologies from start up to established. The event also had a record number of partnering meetings as well as the most drinks ordered at the reception, lol! It is a sincere pleasure working with this inspiring and creative community and we look forward to planning the 2016 conference. Huge thanks to everyone.

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  • July 10, 2015

  • Meet The PODD 2015 Keynotes

    PODD: Partnership Opportunities in Drug Delivery 2015 is delighted to announce the keynote speakers. The annual keynote address with Dr Robert Langer, David H. Koch Institute Professor, MIT is scheduled to open the program on October 5th and the focus will be on nanotechnology. Following Dr Langer for the first time at PODD, we are […]

    robert langer

    Dr. Robert Langer

    PODD: Partnership Opportunities in Drug Delivery 2015 is delighted to announce the keynote speakers. The annual keynote address with Dr Robert Langer, David H. Koch Institute Professor, MIT is scheduled to open the program on October 5th and the focus will be on nanotechnology.

    Bahija Jallal 1small

    Dr Bahija Jallal

    Following Dr Langer for the first time at PODD, we are pleased to welcome Dr Bahija Jallal, EVP, AstraZeneca, Head of MedImmune address a number of challenging centered around culture, innovation and change. She will be joined by PODD veteran and colleague Dr Anand Subramony, VP, Drug Delivery & Device Development, MedImmune.

    Lastly and also new to the program, Stéphane Bancel, CEO, Moderna Therapeutics is scheduled to keynote on October 6th. His company was recently names #1 Disruptor on the third-annual CNBC Disruptor 50 list. For the second year in a row, CNBC recognized Moderna as one of the country’s most ambitious and innovative companies changing the economy and overall  business landscape.

    stephane Bancel

    Stéphane Bancel

    PODD is a strategic level conference for professionals in the pharma, biotech, drug delivery and investor space looking for a thorough overview of the latest drug delivery technologies along with an update on deals and opportunities to improve therapies and extend the life cycle of a drug. The conference includes and facilitates ample networking time and services for one-on-one meetings. PODD is chaired by Dr Barbara Lueckel, Head of Research & Technologies Partnering at Roche.

    For more about the PODD Conference visit: http://theconferenceforum.org/conferences/partners-in-drug-delivery/overview/

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  • May 13, 2015

  • Congratulations to Keynote Stéphane Bancel and Moderna for their #1 Disruptive Ranking by CNBC

    Congratulations to Moderna’s Stephane Bancel, our PODD 2015 keynote and Dr Tal Zaks, featured speaker at Immuno-Oncology 360° for leading the #1 ranked disruptive company according to CNBC. “The third annual Disruptor 50 list, CNBC features private companies in 16 industries—from aerospace to financial services to cybersecurity to retail—whose innovations are revolutionizing the business landscape. […]

    Congratulations to Moderna’s Stephane Bancel, our PODD 2015 keynote and Dr Tal Zaks, featured speaker at Immuno-Oncology 360° for leading the #1 ranked disruptive company according to CNBC.

    “The third annual Disruptor 50 list, CNBC features private companies in 16 industries—from aerospace to financial services to cybersecurity to retail—whose innovations are revolutionizing the business landscape. These forward-thinking upstarts have identified unexploited niches in the marketplace that have the potential to become billion-dollar businesses, and they rushed to fill them. In the process, they are creating new ecosystems for their products and services. ”

    moderna_bancel*150

    Stéphane Bancel, President and Founding CEO, Moderna Therapeutics

    President and Founding CEO, Stéphane Bancel will keynote the 2015 Partnership Opportunities in Drug Delivery Conference. Stéphane joined Moderna in the summer of 2011 when it was a one employee and one patent company, after Dr. Noubar Afeyan and the board described to him the technology behind messenger RNA Therapeutics™. He has assembled a world-class team and raised the company’s financing. Stéphane is named as an inventor on over 45 patent filings in the field of messenger RNA technology. These filings include claims covering a broad range of novel compositions and formulations as well as manufacturing and clinical methods in the fields of human and animal therapeutics, diagnostics and cell processing.

    zaks

    Tal Zaks, MD, PhD, C​hief Medical Officer, Moderna Therapeutics

     

     

    Tal Zaks, MD, PhD, C​hief Medical Officer will address the IO Investment Landscape and Business Perspective at the 1st annual At Immuno-Oncology 360° along with Michael Schmidt, PhD, Director, Biotechnology, Leerink Partners, Mark Simon, Partner, Torreya Partners, and Robert Stein, MD, PhD, Chief Science Officer, Agenus, Inc.

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  • April 23, 2015

  • The Problem Solver: Cancer. Diabetes. Liver disease.

    April’s MIT Technology Review features a profile on PODD’s Annual Keynote Dr. Robert Langer. The piece titled, “The Problem Solver” explores the bioengineering challenges that Dr. Langer has and continues to work on. The Problem Solver by Amanda Schaffer When Robert Langer completed his doctorate in chemical engineering in 1974, he received around 20 offers […]

    April’s MIT Technology Review features a profile on PODD’s Annual Keynote Dr. Robert Langer. The piece titled, “The Problem Solver” explores the bioengineering challenges that Dr. Langer has and continues to work on.

    The Problem Solver by Amanda Schaffer

    When Robert Langer completed his doctorate in chemical engineering in 1974, he received around 20 offers from oil and chemical companies, including four from Exxon. Many of his peers went to work in the industry, but when confronted with the possibility of a professional life devoted to increasing oil yield by a fraction of a percent per year, he balked. “I don’t want to insult those companies,” he says, “but I hoped to have a greater impact on people’s lives.” After a protracted job search, he accepted a low-paying postdoctoral position at Children’s Hospital Boston, in the laboratory of the renowned surgeon and medical researcher Judah Folkman.

    Continue Reading Here

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  • October 17, 2014

  • Robert Langer talks science, business and how they intersect at Partnership Opportunities in Drug Delivery

    Master scientist and entrepreneur Robert Langer offered his thoughts on those topics and their relationship to drug delivery to FierceDrugDelivery in his MIT office and later to the field at large at the Partnership Opportunities in Drug Delivery conference in Boston. Read the full article here: http://www.fiercedrugdelivery.com/story/robert-langer-talks-science-business-and-how-they-intersect/2014-10-15?utm_medium=nl&utm_source=internal

    Master scientist and entrepreneur Robert Langer offered his thoughts on those topics and their relationship to drug delivery to FierceDrugDelivery in his MIT office and later to the field at large at the Partnership Opportunities in Drug Delivery conference in Boston.

    Read the full article here: http://www.fiercedrugdelivery.com/story/robert-langer-talks-science-business-and-how-they-intersect/2014-10-15?utm_medium=nl&utm_source=internal

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  • October 2, 2014

  • New Drug-Delivery Capsule May Replace Injections

    Fantastic article to share from MIT on a pill coated with tiny needles that can deliver drugs directly into the lining of the digestive tract. Could this truly replace injections and instead one can swallow itsy bitsy needles with no pain and problem? We do look forward to discussing this topic along with so many interesting drug […]

    Fantastic article to share from MIT on a pill coated with tiny needles that can deliver drugs directly into the lining of the digestive tract. Could this truly replace injections and instead one can swallow itsy bitsy needles with no pain and problem? We do look forward to discussing this topic along with so many interesting drug delivery technologies at PODD on October 14-15 in Boston.

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  • August 26, 2014

  • Medtech Boston talks with Valerie Bowling about Conference Forum events

    If you’re interested in disruptive innovations in clinical trials or drug delivery, Boston is prime real-estate. That’s why The Conference Forum will be hosting four major events in September and October 2014: Mobile and Clinical Trials; Global Clinical Trials; DPharm: Disruptive Innovations to Advance Clinical Trials; and Partnerships in Drug Delivery. We caught up with […]

    If you’re interested in disruptive innovations in clinical trials or drug delivery, Boston is prime real-estate. That’s why The Conference Forum will be hosting four major events in September and October 2014: Mobile and Clinical Trials; Global Clinical Trials; DPharm: Disruptive Innovations to Advance Clinical Trials; and Partnerships in Drug Delivery. We caught up with conference director Valerie Bowling to find out about these meetings. Click here for more…
    http://medtechboston.medstro.com/conference-forum-events-in-boston-to-focus-on-clinical-trial-innovation/

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  • June 2, 2014

  • Scouting External Drug Delivery Technology Panel is Confirmed for PODD 2014

    Richard Korsmeyer, PhD, Senior Research Fellow, Head of External Technology & Collaborations at Pfizer will moderate the opening panel at PODD on October 14th in Boston on Scouting External Drug Delivery Technology. Key discussion points include: Understanding the process and specific technology interest Methods of sourcing external delivery technologies and DDS-enabled product Key factors and criteria used during […]

    Richard Korsmeyer, PhD, Senior Research Fellow, Head of External Technology & Collaborations at Pfizer will moderate the opening panel at PODD on October 14th in Boston on Scouting External Drug Delivery Technology. Key discussion points include:

    • Understanding the process and specific technology interest
    • Methods of sourcing external delivery technologies and DDS-enabled product
    • Key factors and criteria used during a scouting/evaluation process
    • Types of collaborations and deal terms
    • Examples of “high priority” DDS technologies of interest
    • Licensing platform technologies vs. drug-specific delivery system

    Joining Dr Korsmeyer on the panel includes:

    Jason Ehrick, PhD, Associate Director, Respiratory Product Development, Merck
    Mary Gardner, Director of Technology Assessment, Hospira
    Matthew Hilborn, Strategic Technology & Business Development Specialist, GSK
    Keith Horspool, PhD, VP, Pharmaceutical Development, Boehringer Ingelheim
    Riccardo Panicucci, PhD, Global Head of Chemical & Pharmaceutical Profiling (CPP), Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Inc.

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  • October 4, 2013

  • The Need and the Challenge of Delivering Innovative Topical Ophthalmic Treatments

      Kim Brazzell, MD, CMO and  Hongming Chen, VP, Research, from Kala Pharmaceuticals share their thoughts on “The Need and the Challenge of Delivering Innovative Topical Ophthalmic Treatments”     The need for improved ocular disease therapies is large and growing due to the increasingly aging population. Many currently marketed therapies are associated with frequent dosing or […]

     

    Kim Brazzell, MD, CMO and  Hongming ChenVP, Research, from Kala Pharmaceuticals share their thoughts on “The Need and the Challenge of Delivering Innovative Topical Ophthalmic Treatments”

     

     

    The need for improved ocular disease therapies is large and growing due to the increasingly aging population. Many currently marketed therapies are associated with frequent dosing or invasive delivery methods (i.e., implants, injections) and sub-optimal therapeutic benefit. To address this need, a number of novel delivery approaches are beginning to emerge, including novel protein and small molecule therapeutics and targeted nanoparticles to name just a few. However, a significant challenge remains to provide more convenient (less frequent and/or less-invasive) treatment options with the potential for improved efficacy and safety. Satisfying the growing market in a more effective and user-friendly manner by delivering drugs to the eye in a non-invasive fashion remains a challenge because conventional non-invasive approaches such as eye drops have not been able to penetrate the mucosal barrier to achieve optimal therapeutic benefit. In fact, up to this point, mucus layers have been largely overlooked as a limitation for drug efficacy because therapeutic agents become trapped by the tear film and are cleared via blinking without penetrating the mucus layers. One novel approach that is beginning to demonstrate encouraging results is Kala Pharmaceutical’s mucus penetrating particle (MPP) technology. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that MPPs can improve drug retention, suggesting the potential for greater efficacy at a fraction of the standard therapeutic dose compared to traditional therapies. This is accomplished by facilitating penetration through the mucus layer of tear film. Kala’s MPP technology allows therapeutic agents to avoid being trapped by the tear film and cleared via blinking, thereby enhancing the penetration of drugs at the site of disease. Kala is employing this technology to develop innovative topical treatments for both front and back of the eye disease. Beyond ophthalmology, this technology can be applied to a number of other applications, including respiratory diseases (e.g., asthma and cystic fibrosis), gastrointestinal and vaginal diseases, and mucosal vaccines. We look forward to learning more about the many innovative new approaches to drug delivery at the upcoming Partnerships in Drug Delivery conference.

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  • October 2, 2013

  • Innovations in Bioavailability Enhancement with Lipid-based Formulation Technology

      Eduardo Jule, Ph.D., Senior Manager, Capsugel, shares his thoughts on “Innovations in Bioavailability Enhancement with Lipid-based Formulation Technology” Lipid-based formulations (LBF) have become a well-established strategy to improve bioavailability of poorly soluble compounds. With a pipeline of increasingly complex drug candidates with bioavailability challenges, pharmaceutical companies are turning to Capsugel’s Dosage Form Solutions team […]

     

    Eduardo Jule, Ph.D., Senior Manager, Capsugel, shares his thoughts on “Innovations in Bioavailability Enhancement with Lipid-based Formulation Technology”

    Lipid-based formulations (LBF) have become a well-established strategy to improve bioavailability of poorly soluble compounds. With a pipeline of increasingly complex drug candidates with bioavailability challenges, pharmaceutical companies are turning to Capsugel’s Dosage Form Solutions team early in the R&D process for our specialized expertise in LBF design, testing and manufacturing to help accelerate the drug development process and reduce costs to create innovative dosage forms. Our team of formulation scientists provides support in a number of ways, including identifying the best performing LBF using a systematic and rational science-based formulation approach. Securing the right partner and engaging early in the development cycle can be the key to success in LBF development.

    LBF approaches have traditionally been based on “trial and error.” Capsugel DFS addresses this industry-wide problem in a number of ways. Capsugel’s proprietary lipid expert system uses an extensive database of experimentally generated phase diagrams to guide formulation development. In addition, as a founding member of the Lipid Formulation Classification System (LFCS) Consortium, Capsugel leverages key opinion leader insight when evaluating lipid-based formulations, for example, implementing in vitro digestion as part of its LBF design and testing package. This has resulted in the development of lipid-based formulations that have been proven to increase the bioavailability for more than 20 pharmaceutical compounds.

    I will be providing an overview of Capsugel’s DFS technology, an exploration of key physicochemical and biopharmaceutical characteristics to be considered during drug candidate qualification, a key step to selecting the right technology, as well as our strategy to rationally develop, test and recommend LBF through case studies during PODD’s Drug Delivery Formulation Technologies session at 2:00 p.m. on October 10.

    I also invite you to meet with our team on site – including Bend Research, now part of the Capsugel family – to learn more about our expanding suite of bioavailability enhancement technologies.

     

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  • September 30, 2013

  • Forging A Successful Innovation Partnership

    Sven Stegemann, Ph.D., President, Geriatric Medicines Society, speaker at this years PODD event shares his thoughts on “Forging A Successful Innovation Partnership” The word “innovation” is used over and over again by those in the drug delivery and pharmaceutical industries. However, there are differences in opinion between the two groups as to what makes something “novel” […]

    Sven Stegemann, Ph.D.,

    President, Geriatric Medicines Society, speaker at this years PODD event shares his thoughts on “Forging A Successful Innovation Partnership”

    The word “innovation” is used over and over again by those in the drug delivery and pharmaceutical industries. However, there are differences in opinion between the two groups as to what makes something “novel” or “innovative” as innovation does not always lead to positive outcome. Take lithium-ion batteries that go up in flames, for example, or new drugs that exhibit serious side effects in the real patient population. We have learned to greet innovations with a healthy dose of skepticism. Innovation, then, all comes back to perception.

     

    Let’s take an interesting case on innovation – tablet computers. Invented by Microsoft in the early 1990s and reinvented several times thereafter, tablets remained a niche product until Apple marketed them as iPads nearly 20 years later. At that time, they were perceived as a huge, innovative step in computing.

     

    According to Attridge from the Imperial College in London, the adoption of innovation follows a sequence: (1) perceived relative advantage or value compared to existing products; (2) compatibility with existing values and experiences; (3) complexity referring to difficulty of use and understanding; (4) trialability to experience (at least on a limited basis); and (5) observability of the innovations to the target user. Often when pharmaceutical companies partner with drug delivery companies to develop new products, the drug delivery company tends not to consider that the perception of innovation is a process by itself. This differing perspective on what is “innovation” can cause challenges, especially as drug delivery is just one aspect of a complex drug development program that pharmaceutical companies have to manage. Thus, the “innovation” must be integrated into a holistic framework of drug product development.

     

    Innovative technology must be judged on its incremental advantages or values and not on potential pitfalls, such as why it may not work or may not be as good as the alternatives. Moreover, when a pharmaceutical company asks, “Do you have a reference product to which the technology has been successfully applied and is generating predicted revenues?” the drug delivery company may view this as contradictive to the goal of being an innovative company. Yet, this is the question big pharmaceutical companies often raise.

     

    A successful innovation, perceived and real, requires a common ground of mutual understanding on both sides that balances the true needs of the pharmaceutical company with the real potential and unique aspects of a drug delivery technology. Innovation does not mean blindly following any new idea or technology. Instead, innovation is a complex and interactive process that considers everything from a compound’s attributes, such as its solubility, potency and stability, through to its final delivery, determining where and how a drug is best delivered to and absorbed by the body.  As experts and scientists, whether in the pharmaceutical industry or a small drug delivery company, it is our job to make a fair and unbiased assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of the innovative steps. Innovation always carries a level of uncertainty, but we must give a new idea a fair chance to mature in a positive environment. Innovation is often only realized during a dynamic learning process that removes roadblocks, uncovers the potential of a technology or product and applies real-world experience to bring it to market. In other words, a successful collaboration will evolve if the two partners are able to create a perceptibility of innovation at all stakeholder levels.

     

    We will explore the concept of innovation and the steps to creating more constructive collaborations during an expert panel that I will be moderating on Day Two of the Partnership Opportunities in Drug Delivery conference. Join us at 4:00 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 11.

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  • September 13, 2013

  • Transdermal Delivery Solutions Corp. to present breakthrough technology at PODD 2013.

    PODD attendees will be among the first to learn about a revolutionary spray-on drug delivery system for the treatment of low testosterone. Kenneth Kirby, president and CEO of Transdermal Delivery Solutions Corporation (TDSC), will introduce his patented treatment technology during his talk titled, “Innovations in Transdermal Drug Delivery,” during the noon session on Friday, October […]

    PODD attendees will be among the first to learn about a revolutionary spray-on drug delivery system for the treatment of low testosterone. Kenneth Kirby, president and CEO of Transdermal Delivery Solutions Corporation (TDSC), will introduce his patented treatment technology during his talk titled, “Innovations in Transdermal Drug Delivery,” during the noon session on Friday, October 11.

    Recently awarded FDA approval for clinical testing, TDSC’s Testagen®TDS provides safe and effective treatment for the approximately 13.8 million men in the United States who suffer from low testosterone levels, which has been linked to common ailments ranging from hypertension to fatigue to low sex drive. Testagen®TDS is expected to revolutionize topical testosterone application because it enables rapid, nearly complete absorption of controlled amounts of testosterone across intact skin. The system is based on a delivery vehicle which mimics physical chemistry of compounds that readily transmigrate the skin and provides faster absorption, lower concentrations left on the skin, and lower cost than current transdermal formulations. The formulation process produces an extremely stable dose-specific and drug-specific formula enabling rapid, safe and efficient transdermal drug delivery.

    Testagen® TDS was developed through a proprietary system that measures and calculates the intermolecular attractive and repulsive forces of the drug. The patent features include the conceptual development and process for designing and formulating a unique, balanced transdermal system for a particular drug, in this case Testosterone, including stimulus of cellular activation energy. Because the resulting product is liquid, dosing can be adjusted for individual needs by modifying the number of sprays applied. The rapidly drying ethanol base is expected to greatly diminish or eliminate any danger of transferring testosterone to women or children, a significant health risk from existing gel therapies. It is expected that Testagen® TDS will stand alone as the only product to meaningfully address the health risk of transference with a more convenient, flexible-dosing, easy-to-apply product.

    Learn more about Testagen®TDS at the noon session on Friday, October 11, 2013. You can also learn more about TDSC and its revolutionaryresearch at http://www.tdsc.us

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  • August 13, 2013

  • A Peek at PODD 2012

    PODD-Partnership Opportunities in Drug Delivery presentation from October 2012, Boston, MA on “Strategies for Developing and Commercializing Biobetters & Biosimilars” by Phil Smith, PhD, Founder, PNPSmith advisors, LLC.

    PODD-Partnership Opportunities in Drug Delivery presentation from October 2012, Boston, MA on “Strategies for Developing and Commercializing Biobetters & Biosimilars” by Phil Smith, PhD, Founder, PNPSmith advisors, LLC.

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  • July 22, 2013

  • Thoughts on PODD Industry Keynote: The Future of BioTherapeutics

    Mak Jawadekar, PhD, formerly Director, Portfolio Management & Analytics of Pfizer and Scientific Board Member of Oncobiologics and Livwell Therapeutics shares his thoughts on John Ludwig’s PhD (SVP, BioTherapeutics Pharmaceutical Sciences, Pfizer) upcoming presentation at PODD, October 10-11th, 2013, Boston, MA. John’s presentation on the Future of BioTherapeutics and the importance of drug delivery will shed light on: The growing importance […]

    Mak Jawadekar, PhD, formerly Director, Portfolio Management & Analytics of Pfizer and Scientific Board Member of Oncobiologics and Livwell Therapeutics shares his thoughts on John Ludwig’s PhD (SVP, BioTherapeutics Pharmaceutical Sciences, Pfizer) upcoming presentation at PODD, October 10-11th, 2013, Boston, MA.

    John’s presentation on the Future of BioTherapeutics and the importance of drug delivery will shed light on:

    • The growing importance of Bio-therapeutics:Growing industry trends and Pfizer’s portfolio transformation in the past decade. Pfizer used to be 90:10 Small molecules to large molecules, where as now the mix has gone to 75:25 and probably equilibrate to 50:50 in the coming decade
    • Also, for the PODD audience, linking the importance of drug delivery technologies for medical and commercial product differentiation based on customer insights is going to be quite important and timely as these days, we see many combinations of ‘Diagnostics/ drug delivery injector as well as GPS based communication device like a i-Phone
    • I am sure he will discuss growing cost of product development and how it is being handled by Big-Pharma companies
    • Also, quite critical to the audience is to understand different and more creative ways of collaboration between Pharma and DDS technology developers: open innovation; early engagement; cost- and resource-sharing; non-competitive Consortiums, including those with Academia and educational institutions globally.
    • His discussion on how will the future of R&D investments and it’s  impact the drug delivery sector will shed light on the new “Business Models”, emergence of BUs within Pfizer, new Organizational structures for R & D in the last 5 years and also enhancement of BD Groups within Pharma is a great indicator of the new era in Pharmaceutical industry..

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  • July 11, 2013

  • The ‘What Ifs’ of nanoparticles & nanomedicines with Dr. Omid Farokhzad

    Featured PODD nanomedicine panelist & leading researcher, Dr. Omid Farokhzad, Associate professor of Anaesthesia, Harvard University speaks with Simon Constable, Wall Street Journal Columnist on Digits. He explains the what ifs of nanoparticles and nanomedicines such as: What if you could swallow a pill that conducts surgery? What can the world’s tiniest robots do to DNA […]

    Featured PODD nanomedicine panelist & leading researcher, Dr. Omid Farokhzad, Associate professor of Anaesthesia, Harvard University speaks with Simon Constable, Wall Street Journal Columnist on Digits. He explains the what ifs of nanoparticles and nanomedicines such as:

    • What if you could swallow a pill that conducts surgery?
    • What can the world’s tiniest robots do to DNA and cells?

    At Partnerships in Drug Delivery, October 10th – 11th, 2013, Boston, MA, Dr. Farokhzad will moderate the panel addressing if Pharma should be investing in this area. Discussion points include:

    • Is nanomedicine now better positioned to make an impact on patients’ lives?
    • How to assess the commercial aspects of nanoparticle development
    • How is nanomedicine expected to potentially transform medicine?
    • What is the role of nanomedicine in the era of genomics?
    • Barriers and challenges – safety/nanotoxicology, manufacturing issues
    • What are the unique aspects of the nanomedicine business model?

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  • July 10, 2013

  • Xeris is Looking Forward to PODD 2013

    Xeris is looking forward to participating in the PODD conference again this year, especially since the  event aligns with our goal to pursue partnering opportunities as part of our XeriScreen™ program.  With our novel formulation technologies, XeriSol™ and XeriJect™, we strive to develop a number of  therapeutics and delivery technologies for ready-to-use, low-volume, subcutaneous injections […]

    Xeris is looking forward to participating in the PODD conference again this year, especially since the  event aligns with our goal to pursue partnering opportunities as part of our XeriScreen™ program.  With our novel formulation technologies, XeriSol™ and XeriJect™, we strive to develop a number of  therapeutics and delivery technologies for ready-to-use, low-volume, subcutaneous injections of small molecules and biologics that are not stable or soluble in aqueous systems.

    Our technologies uniquely address the sources of drug degradation with our non-aqueous formulation process. The elimination of water and most excipients in the formulation and the use of non-aqueous diluents and solvents allow drugs to be pre-mixed, resulting in ultra-low volume solutions and suspensions that are ready for injection, patient-friendly, and that can be used across multiple delivery devices (e.g. auto-injectors and pumps).

    For our XeriSol™ products, we’ve found that some bio-pharmaceuticals coupled with biocompatible  solvents form highly-concentrated solutions. This has the added advantage of maintaining relatively lowvolumes while allowing the use of commercially available needles, syringes, and auto-injection devices, significantly accelerating the time to market.

    Our XeriSol™ product portfolio starts with glucagon for the treatment of hypoglycemia in the insulin-dependent diabetes population. XeriSol™ Glucagon will be applied to the G-Pen™ for severe hypoglycemic events and the G-Pen Mini™ for precise dosing and non-caloric dosing applications for mild to moderate hypoglycemia. We’re also using the same formulation for our G-Pump™ glucagon for use in the bionic pancreas, often referred to as the “Holy Grail” in diabetes care and management.

    Our XeriJect™ technology dramatically reduces or eliminates excipients for lyophilization powders. This results in protein powders that are more compact on a volume/weight basis. The powders used to create our ready to inject Micro-Pastes™ have significantly higher protein concentrations when compared to traditionally manufactured protein powders that require reconstitution with sterile water prior to injection. Our Micro-Pastes™ significantly reduce injection volume (up to 1,000 times) and eliminate the need for water-based reconstitution.

    We welcome opportunities to discuss the formulation of stable and small molecules, mAbs, proteins, and peptides that leverage our technology platform. For more information about our programs, please
    contact Doug Baum (bd@xerispharma.com). We look forward to meeting you at PODD 2013!

    http://www.xerispharma.com/

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  • June 14, 2013

  • Scientific Luminaries to Keynote at 3rd Annual PODD

    Industry leaders and life science legends Dr Robert Langer and Dr George M. Whitesides keynote the Partnership Opportunities in Drug Delivery Conference presented by the Conference Forum. The event presents a strategic level program on pharma/biotech drug delivery partnership opportunities. New York, New York (PRWEB) June 12, 2013 The Conference Forum is pleased to announce […]

    Industry leaders and life science legends Dr Robert Langer and Dr George M. Whitesides keynote the Partnership Opportunities in Drug Delivery Conference presented by the Conference Forum. The event presents a strategic level program on pharma/biotech drug delivery partnership opportunities.

    New York, New York (PRWEB) June 12, 2013

    The Conference Forum is pleased to announce the keynotes for the 3rd annual PODD: Partnership Opportunities in Drug Delivery event, which takes place on October 10-11 in Boston. PODD is strategic level networking event designed to bring drug delivery innovators together with key decision makers at pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device companies. This event provides the opportunity to learn about cutting-edge delivery technologies and meet with senior level executives and scientists.

    To kick-off the PODD event, Robert Langer, PhD, David H. Koch Institute Professor at MIT will engage in a fireside style chat to discuss the difference between success and failure of drug delivery technologies.

    On the second day of the conference George M. Whitesides, PhD, Woodford L. and Ann A. Flowers University Professor, Harvard University and Founding Core Faculty Member, Wyss Institute will address how drug delivery will disrupt the future of healthcare.

    PODD is chaired by Barbara Lueckel, PhD, Global Business Development Director, Roche and features a wide range of drug delivery technologies, pharmaceutical and biotech business development panels, together with new discussions related to delivering biologics, role of drug delivery in the R&D pipeline, nanomedicine, and funding in the drug delivery sector.

    We are excited to bring all the major components together that advance drug delivery partnerships,” Valerie Bowling, Executive Director of the Conference Forum.

    Other conference highlights include:
    ⁃    How drug delivery is disrupting the diagnostics industry
    ⁃    Who is funding drug delivery
    ⁃    The next paradigm on how biologics will be delivered
    ⁃    New deal structures and models
    ⁃    POV from heads of R&D on the role of drug delivery
    ⁃    Partnering and networking tools and facilities

    To learn more about the PODD conference, visit http://www.theconferenceforum.org.

    About the Conference Forum

    The Conference Forum has a very specific focus – developing specialized events both public and private as well as research groups and advisory boards for professionals in the life science industry. We currently offer conferences for R&D leaders, Clinical Development professionals, young and established Biotech executives, and Drug Delivery specialists. Our mission is to create the best content in an ideal forum for the exchange of ideas among peers and networking for Pharmaceutical and Biotech professionals.

    Related Links:
    Dr Robert S. Langer, PhD, Biography
    Dr George Whitesides, PhD, Biography
    Barbara Lueckel, PhD, Biography

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  • November 27, 2012

  • Our Keynote Dr Langer recognized in NYTs for his Innovation

    Hatching Ideas, and Companies, by the Dozens at M.I.T. How do you take particles in a test tube, or components in a tiny chip, and turn them into a $100 million company? Dr. Robert Langer, 64, knows how. Since the 1980s, his Langer Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has spun out companies whose products treat cancer, diabetes, […]

    Hatching Ideas, and Companies, by the Dozens at M.I.T.

    How do you take particles in a test tube, or components in a tiny chip, and turn them into a $100 million company?

    Dr. Robert Langer, 64, knows how. Since the 1980s, his Langer Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has spun out companies whose products treat cancerdiabetes, heart disease and schizophrenia, among other diseases, and even thicken hair.

    The Langer Lab is on the front lines of turning discoveries made in the lab into a range of drugs and drug delivery systems. Without this kind of technology transfer, the thinking goes, scientific discoveries might well sit on the shelf, stifling innovation.

    A chemical engineer by training, Dr. Langer has helped start 25 companies and has 811 patents, issued or pending, to his name. More than 250 companies have licensed or sublicensed Langer Lab patents.

    Polaris Venture Partners, a Boston venture capital firm, has invested $220 million in 18 Langer Lab-inspired businesses. Combined, these businesses have improved the health of many millions of people, says Terry McGuire, co-founder of Polaris.

    Along the way, Dr. Langer and his lab, including about 60 postdoctoral and graduate students at a time, have found a way to navigate some slippery territory: the intersection of academic research and the commercial market.

    Over the last 30 years, many universities — including M.I.T. — have set up licensing offices that oversee the transfer of scientific discoveries to companies. These offices have become a major pathway for universities seeking to put their research to practical use, not to mention add to their revenue streams.

    In the sciences in particular, technology transfer has become a key way to bring drugs and other treatments to market. “The model of biomedical innovation relies on research coming out of universities, often funded by public money,” says Josephine Johnston, director of research at the Hastings Center, a bioethics research organization based in Garrison, N.Y.

    Just a few of the products that have emerged from the Langer Lab are a small wafer that delivers a dose of chemotherapy used to treat brain cancer; sugar-sequencing tools that can be used to create new drugs like safer and more effective blood thinners; and a miniaturized chip (a form of nanotechnology) that can test for diseases.

    The chemotherapy wafer, called the Gliadel, is licensed by Eisai Inc. The company behind the sugar-sequencing tools, Momenta Pharmaceuticals, raised $28.4 million in an initial public offering in 2004. The miniaturized chip is made by T2Biosystems,  which completed a $23 million round of financing in the summer of 2011.

    “It’s inconvenient to have to send things to a lab,” so the company is trying to develop more sophisticated methods, says Dr. Ralph Weissleder, a co-founder, with Dr. Langer and others, of T2Biosystems and a professor at Harvard Medical School.

    For Dr. Langer, starting a company is not the same as it was, say, for Mark Zuckerberg with Facebook. “Bob is not consumed with any one company,” says H. Kent Bowen, an emeritus professor of business administration at Harvard Business School who wrote a case study on the Langer Lab. “His mission is to create the idea.”

    Dr. Bowen observes that there are many other academic laboratories, including highly productive ones, but that the Langer Lab’s combination of people, spun-out companies and publications sets it apart. He says Dr. Langer “walks into the great unknown and then makes these discoveries.”

    Dr. Langer is well known for his mentoring abilities. He is “notorious for replying to e-mail in two minutes, whether it’s a lowly graduate school student or the president of the United States,” says Paulina Hill, who worked in his lab from 2009 to 2011 and is now a senior associate at Polaris Venture Partners. (According to Dr. Langer, he has corresponded directly with President Obama about stem cell research and federal funds for the sciences.)

    Dr. Langer says he looks at his students “as an extended family,” adding that “I really want them to do well.”

    And they have, whether in business or in academia, or a combination of the two. One former student, Ram Sasisekharan, helped found Momenta and now runs his own lab at M.I.T. Ganesh Venkataraman Kaundinya is Momenta’s chief scientific officer and senior vice president for research.

    Hongming Chen is vice president of research at Kala Pharmaceuticals. Howard Bernstein is chief scientific officer at Seventh Sense Biosystems, a blood-testing company. Still others have taken jobs in the law or in government.

    Dr. Langer says he spends about eight hours a week working on companies that come out of his lab. Of the 25 that he helped start, he serves on the boards of 12 and is an informal adviser to 4. All of his entrepreneurial activity, which includes some equity stakes, has made him a millionaire. But he says he is mainly motivated by a desire to improve people’s health.

    Operating from the sixth floor of the David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research on the M.I.T. campus in Cambridge, Mass., Dr. Langer’s lab has a research budget of more than $10 million for 2012, coming mostly from federal sources.

    The research in labs like Dr. Langer’s is eyed closely by pharmaceutical companies. While drug companies employ huge research and development teams, they may not be as freewheeling and nimble, Dr. Langer says. The basis for many long-range discoveries has “come out of academia, including gene therapy, gene sequencing and tissue engineering,” he says.

    He has served as a consultant to pharmaceutical companies. Their large size, he says, can end up being an impediment.

    “Very often when you are going for real innovation,” he says, “you have to go against prevailing wisdom, and it’s hard to go against prevailing wisdom when there are people who have been there for a long time and you have some vice president who says, ‘No, that doesn’t make sense.’ ”

    Pharmaceutical companies are eager to tap into the talent at leading research universities. In 2008, for example, Washington University in St. Louis announced a $25 million pact with Pfizer to collaborate more closely on biomedical research.

    But in some situations, the close — critics might say cozy — ties between business and academia have the potential to create conflicts of interest.

    There was a controversy earlier this year when it was revealed that the president of the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center owned stock in Aveo Oncology, which had announced earlier that the university would be leading clinical trials of one of its cancer drugs.  Last month, the University of Texas announced that he would be allowed to keep his ties with three pharmaceutical companies, including Aveo Oncology; his holdings will be placed in a blind trust.

    “One question is how much is the commercial interest driving the research,” Ms. Johnston says. “I think that universities and the public policy makers are a little unsure where they think the balance should be. Does this opportunity skew the research agenda in terms of commercial application instead of the public interest?” She was speaking generally, and not commenting on any particular institution.

    Dr. Langer says that there is no pressure at his lab for students to turn their research into a business. In fact, he says, about half of his students stay in academia. “I feel like one of our successes is that we trained so many great people who are now teaching at universities,” he says, adding that strict ethics rules are in place to prevent conflicts.

    If they remain in academia, scientists at M.I.T. can still take equity stakes in the companies that their discoveries helped form. But they are barred from owning shares in any company that provides a research grant to their lab. They also cannot be executives of a company, although they can serve as paid advisers.

    One issue at the crux of technology transfer is: How do universities protect the public good?

    “M.I.T. always reserves rights for all nonprofit institutions, noncommercial research and education,” says Lita Nelsen, director of M.I.T.’s Technology Licensing Office, who has helped the Langer Lab file for hundreds of patents, close to 80 percent of which have been approved.

    As an example, a controlled-release polio vaccine developed in the Langer Lab was financed by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation for use in the developing world. The foundation has also arranged to use, through Seventh Sense Biosystems, a rapid way to draw blood with a microneedle patch that could be used outside the confines of a medical center. (The approach is still in human trials.) The Langer Lab has also been working with the United States Army on a regenerative-tissue project that would help wounded soldiers from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    When a discovery is licensed at M.I.T., the university splits the profit three ways — among the department where the discovery was made, the university and the inventors.

    “The founding principle in 1861, when M.I.T. was created, was to provide and support the industrialization of America. I always say we were founded on the principle of tech transfer,” says Susan Hockfield, who served as M.I.T.’s president from December 2004 until June of this year.

    David H. Koch, executive vice president of Koch Industries, the conglomerate based in Wichita, Kan., wrote in an e-mail that “innovation and education have long fueled the world’s most powerful economies, so I can’t think of a better or more natural synergy than the one between academia and industry.” Mr. Koch endowed Dr. Langer’s professorship at M.I.T. and is a graduate of the university.

    Yes, many of the Langer Lab’s discoveries are helping to fight disease. But you can’t say that about a hair-thickening product that is made by a company called Living Proof. The product is sold at stores like Nordstrom and Sephora; Dr. Langer serves on the company’s board and holds a small equity stake.

    How did he end up in the hair care business? That discovery actually came from a way to create new materials, the original intent of which was to treat prostate and ovarian cancer. Various chemical compounds, however, could be fished out from the discovery for many different purposes, including a hair thickening product.

    Of course, not everything that comes out of the lab is a sure bet. A drug may not make it past clinical trials, or an alternative treatment may prove more effective.

    Dr. Langer is still assessing the commercial potential of a project involving the vocal cords. He and Dr. Steven M. Zeitels, director of the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation, who has operated on singers like Adele and Julie Andrews, developed a gel that can be used on vocal tubes to make them more pliable. The gel had promising results in clinical trials on dogs, according to Dr. Langer. “I don’t know if it’s a company, though,” he says.

    But he favors the kind of research that takes chances. As Dr. Bowen of Harvard says of Dr. Langer’s students: “They all come away thinking nothing is impossible.”

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  • September 24, 2012

  • Attending Companies at PODD 2012

    An update on some of the companies in attendance on October 1-2nd 2012! Ratio Drug Delivery, Allergan, Catalent Pharma Solutions, MIT, Thomas, McNerney & Partners, Astrazeneca, Hovione, Momenta Pharmaceuticals, Pfizer, Inc., Eli Lilly, MannKind Corp, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Xeris Pharma, Vertex Pharmaceuticals, Amgen, PhaseBio Pharmaceuticals Inc., FluGen Inc., Aptalis, Kala Pharmaceuticals/ Polaris Venture […]

    An update on some of the companies in attendance on October 1-2nd 2012!

    Ratio Drug Delivery, Allergan, Catalent Pharma Solutions, MIT, Thomas, McNerney & Partners, Astrazeneca, Hovione, Momenta Pharmaceuticals, Pfizer, Inc., Eli Lilly, MannKind Corp, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Xeris Pharma, Vertex Pharmaceuticals, Amgen, PhaseBio Pharmaceuticals Inc., FluGen Inc., Aptalis, Kala Pharmaceuticals/ Polaris Venture Partners, Locust Walk Partners, Mystic Pharmaceuticals, Inc, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Atheneos Capital Management, LLC, Global Research Services, LLC (GRS), Capsugel, Biogen Idec, Tapemark, Cubist Pharmaceuticals, Kensey Nash Corporation, Orion Pharma, EmulTech, University of Pittsburgh, Weinberg/Otomagnetics, Unigene Laboratories, Inc., Shire HGT, Skyline Ventures, ZDev Consulting, Alcyone Lifesciences Inc., Baxter, CIMA LABS, INC., F. Hoffmann-La Roche AG, Merck Research Laboratories, Novartis, Patheon, SteadyMed Therapeutics Inc, Celgene, Sanofi, Medesis Pharma, SEAlantis Ltd., Hoffmann-La Roche, Takeda Pharmaceuticals International, RPS, Otomagnetics LLC, Grace, FORMAC Pharmaceuticals, Endo, Collegium Pharmaceuticals, BD Medical, ACTUS Biotechnologies, Inc., West Pharma, University of California, Santa Barbara, STC Biologics, Polyactiva, Octoplus, PNP Smith Advisors, MicroCHIPS Inc, SR One, Path, Novo Nordisk A/S, Medtronic, SpringLeaf Therapeutics inc., Elim Pediatric Pharmaceuticals, J&J, GSK, Boehringer Ingelheim, Cerulean Pharma Inc, 3M Drug Delivery Systems Division, Tracy BioConsulting LLC, JSB Partners, BioAxone BioSciences Inc, Eisai Inc., Alnylam

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  • July 16, 2012

  • Another Peak at PODD 2011

    A Presentation on Transforming a New Drug or Technology into a Marketed Product. This Presentation was delivered by Mark J. Kontny, PhD, of Patheon Inc. during the 2011 PODD program.

    A Presentation on Transforming a New Drug or Technology into a Marketed Product.

    This Presentation was delivered by Mark J. Kontny, PhD, of Patheon Inc. during the 2011 PODD program.

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  • July 13, 2012

  • Combating Drug Resistance

    Drug resistance is a growing problem in modern medicine. The issue of drug resistance encompasses resistance of bacteria, viruses, parasites and other organisms to antibacterial agents and other drug treatments. This article examines the emergence of multidrug resistant pathogens and introduces a few of the methods available to address the issue – including some new […]

    Combating Drug Resistance

    Drug resistance is a growing problem in modern medicine. The issue of drug resistance encompasses resistance of bacteria, viruses, parasites and other organisms to antibacterial agents and other drug treatments. This article examines the emergence of multidrug resistant pathogens and introduces a few of the methods available to address the issue – including some new developments at the frontiers of modern drug research.

    DRUGS AND ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS

    Naturally available plants and moulds have been used for thousands of years (some more successfully than others) as a treatment for a broad range of ailments. However, it is only over the last couple of centuries that medicine has matured into an important field in modern science, and the use of drugs has led to a marked improvement in hygiene, health and life expectancy.

    Since the discovery of penicillin in 1928, the use of antibiotics and other medicinal drugs has become a global industry with a value measured in hundreds of billions of dollars. Indeed, the use of drugs – including antivirals and antimicrobial agents – are central to medicine today. The use of manufactured antibiotics is now widespread both in humans and in livestock. We rely on antibiotics, antivirals, vaccines and other forms of medicine to protect us against sickness and disease. However, there is a problem….

    For more on this article from PODD Media Partner, Pharmaceutical Int. Please visit here.

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  • July 3, 2012

  • Drug Delivery Technologies Show Promise of Improving Clinical Outcomes for Patients at PODD

    New York, NY — In an effort to remove barriers and embrace collaborations to get therapeutics to patients faster, pharmaceutical and biotech companies will listen to more than 25 drug delivery technology presentations, ranging from novel delivery devices to formulation technologies at the 2nd Annual PODD: Partnership Opportunities in Drug Delivery conference, October 1-2, 2012, […]

    Bob LangerNew York, NY — In an effort to remove barriers and embrace collaborations to get therapeutics to patients faster, pharmaceutical and biotech companies will listen to more than 25 drug delivery technology presentations, ranging from novel delivery devices to formulation technologies at the 2nd Annual PODD: Partnership Opportunities in Drug Delivery conference, October 1-2, 2012, at the Boston Park Plaza hotel in Boston, MA.

    Keynotes

    Stephen OThe PODD program is designed to introduce emerging and enabling drug delivery technologies to help pharmaceutical and biotech drug formulators obtain better clinical outcomes for patients. The PODD event features keynote addresses by two leading scientists in drug delivery, Dr. Robert Langer, the David H. Koch Institute Professor, MIT, and Dr. Stephen Oesterle, Senior Vice President for Medicine and Technology, Medtronic.

    Leadership

    BarbaraDr Barbara Lueckel, Global Business Development Director, Roche returns as the PODD Chairperson. Dr. Lueckel found the inaugural PODD event served as a platform to facilitate innovative collaborations, noting that, “The panels provided an opportunity to gain further insights into companies’ thinking on drug delivery partnering and to engage panelists into additional discussions.” She also said, “I am glad we will see more panel discussions in 2012.”


    Additional industry experts speaking at PODD include:
    Dr Sesha
    Dr. Sesha Neervannan
    Vice President, Pharmaceutical Development, Allergan


    Subramory
    Dr. Julia Rashba-Step
    Senior Director, Novel Delivery Technologies, Pfizer


    SubDr. Anand Subramony
    Head of Novel Delivery Technologies & Therapeutics, Novartis


    KeithDr. Keith Horspool
    Vice President, Pharmaceutical Development, Boehringer Ingelheim


    Further highlights of the PODD program include pre-arranged one-on-one partnering meetings, a drug delivery exhibit hall, numerous networking breaks and a reception. Over 250 attendees are anticipated. Companies participating in the 2012 PODD event include Allergan, Aptalis, Becton Dickinson, Boehringer Ingelheim, CIMA Labs, GlaxoSmithKline, Janssen, 3M Drug Delivery Systems, Medtronic, Merck, Novartis, MannKind, Patheon, Pfizer, Roche, Shire, Catalent and many more.

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  • July 3, 2012

  • A Peak at PODD 2011

    A Presentation on Practical Guidance to Conveying the Value in your Drug Delivery. This Presentation was delivered by Fernando Salles, PhD, CLP, of Merck & Co. Inc. during the 2011 PODD program. For the 2012 program agenda, please click here.

    A Presentation on Practical Guidance to Conveying the Value in your Drug Delivery.

    This Presentation was delivered by Fernando Salles, PhD, CLP, of Merck & Co. Inc. during the 2011 PODD program.

    For the 2012 program agenda, please click here.

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  • May 1, 2012

  • 2012 Dates Announced!

    2nd Annual PODD- Partnership Opportunities in Drug Delivery October 1-2, 2012 Boston Park Plaza Hotel,Boston, MA For more information click here.

    2nd Annual PODD- Partnership Opportunities in Drug Delivery
    October 1-2, 2012
    Boston Park Plaza Hotel,Boston, MA
    For more information click here.

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  • May 1, 2012

  • PODD 2011 Pictures

    Pictures from our PODD 2011 Event, Omni Parker House Hotel, Boston, MA. For more information on our upcoming 2012 event, click here. Or join our LinkedIN group here. Click here to view these pictures larger

    Pictures from our PODD 2011 Event, Omni Parker House Hotel, Boston, MA. For more information on our upcoming 2012 event, click here. Or join our LinkedIN group here.

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